Ramos Describes Frightening Situation After His Tense Interview With Socialist Dictator Maduro

Ramos Describes Frightening Situation After His Tense Interview With Socialist Dictator Maduro

Ramos Describes Frightening Situation After His Tense Interview With Socialist Dictator Maduro

On the Monday evening broadcast, Univision news anchor Patricia Janiot said on the air that Ramos and his colleagues were arbitrarily detained because "apparently the governor Nicolás Maduro was bothered by the questions Jorge Ramos asked him". "He and the other members of the team were freed", tweeted Daniel Coronell, adding their equipment was confiscated.

Ramos, one of the most influential Spanish-speaking journalists in the USA, told The Associated Press late Monday that Maduro cut short the interview after 17 minutes when he was shown video on an iPad shot a day earlier of young Venezuelans eating food scraps out of the back of a garbage truck.

Florida Sen. Marco Rubio said a phone call from Ramos to Univision was shut off in the middle of a conversation.

In addition, Ramos said at the end of the interview he showed Maduro a video shot last Sunday of three children in Venezuela behind a trash truck looking for food.

A six-person team of journalists will be deported from Venezuela after upsetting President Nicolas Maduro during an interview at the presidential palace in Caracas, Reuters reports.

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Though Univision's USA news president Daniel Coronell tweeted the crew had been released and we're going back to their hotel, no phone contact has been made with the crew.

Both the USA and Mexican governments have shown their concern for Ramos's wellbeing after the news broke out. When they finally did have a chance to chat with Maduro, he apparently "didn't like" their questions.

Venezuela's Government accuses the United States, which is openly pushing for Mr Maduro to step down, of attempting to orchestrate a coup.

"They didn't give us a reason".

Even if the specific details make this incident more unusual, this latest aggression against a foreign correspondent isn't an exception, but just part of a long pattern of harassment that those who try to cover Venezuela (with some minor exceptions) suffer by the communicational hegemony. Kimberly Breier, the Assistant Secretary of State for Western Hemisphere Affairs, tweeted out, "We insist on their immediate release; the world is watching".

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