Why Marijuana Was A Big Winner From 2018 Midterms (CGC)(CRON)(TLRY)(APHA)

Why Marijuana Was A Big Winner From 2018 Midterms (CGC)(CRON)(TLRY)(APHA)

Why Marijuana Was A Big Winner From 2018 Midterms (CGC)(CRON)(TLRY)(APHA)

Measures legalizing recreational marijuana are being considered during the midterm elections by voters in MI and North Dakota, potentially adding either to the list of nine states with similar laws now in place.

MI voters approved a measure permitting people over age 21 to smoke pot recreationally.

MI has become the 10th state to legalize recreational marijuana.

Ron Galaviz said before Election Day that if the measure passed, he and his colleagues envisioned "dedicated patrols" to spot drivers coming from MI who might be high or have pot on them. The majority voted in favor of legalization either medicinal or adult-use of marijuana, which signals state officials that they should proceed with the necessary reforms.

The proposal passed 55 percent "yes" to 44 percent "no". It allows for the possession of up to 2.5 ounces of marijuana and cultivation of up to 12 plants for personal use, while also establishing a legal framework for the licensing and regulation of marijuana businesses and products.

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Recreational marijuana sales in Canada are expected to generate $4.3-billion in revenue in 2019, or slightly more than 60 per cent of the country's total $7.1-billion marijuana market, which includes medical and illegal sales, consulting firm Deloitte noted. Adults would be able to sell tax-free marijuana is the bill passes, potentially creating a legal but unregulated marketplace unlike any of the existing systems in place among existing recreational weed states. The latter is the only state that does not authorize marijuana stores.

Nationwide, 66 percent of Americans now support the legalization of marijuana according to a recent poll from Gallup. "If there's going to be an economic benefit to legalize marijuana, I want it to be in MI". "We hope lawmakers will implement the measure efficiently and effectively to ensure qualified patients can gain access to their medicine as soon as possible". At a victory party, Christine Stenquist, founder of the advocacy group TRUCE Utah, predicted that the conservative state's decision would influence other states debating legalization.

Opponents, including many law enforcement agencies, prosecutors, chambers of commerce and religious groups, said legalizing marijuana would lead to increased use by children, drug abuse and auto crashes.

"Now that more than 30 states have enacted comprehensive medical marijuana laws, it is time for Congress to step up and address the issue at the federal level". Chairman of the House Rules Committee since 2013, Sessions had blocked the advance of over 36 marijuana-related federal amendments alone. Sessions was defeated by Democrat Colin Allred, a medical marijuana supporter who has criticized Sessions' anti-pot prejudices.

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