After cancellation of Abadi's Tehran visit, Iraqi government praises relations with Iran

After cancellation of Abadi's Tehran visit, Iraqi government praises relations with Iran

After cancellation of Abadi's Tehran visit, Iraqi government praises relations with Iran

Iraqi Prime Minister Haidar al-Abadi has cancelled a visit to Iran, his press office said on Sunday, as the premier came under strong Iranian criticism over his stand on renewed USA sanctions against Tehran.

Ambassador Robert Wood Johnson wrote in the Sunday Telegraph that "we are asking global Britain to use its considerable diplomatic power and influence and join us as we lead a concerted global effort towards a genuinely comprehensive agreement".

"When we were inking the nuclear deal, we stopped production of 20% fuel and deposited the excessive fuel in Russian Federation in almost 10 batches".

The sanctions also concern Tehran's automobile and aviation sector, with tougher sanctions-especially an embargo on Iran's oil and banking sectors-to follow by November 4 should the Islamic Republic fail to accommodate President Trump's terms on "WORLD PEACE". Trump has described the 2015 nuclear deal, officially known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), as a "horrible, one sided" agreement.

"Until then, America is turning up the pressure and we want the United Kingdom by our side".

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Asked about Johnson's article, the British foreign office pointed to comments from Middle East minister Alistair Burt, who last week ruled out Britain going along with the United States.

He said this statement should be seen as a warning by the other side against discarding the nuclear deal, stressing that Iran can even show more extensive progress in other parts of its nuclear activities to go beyond the previous levels.

In the latest threat to the US-UK special relationship, the US' top diplomat in Britain has called on London to back its pressure on Iran, warning of "serious consequences" for businesses who flaunt Washington's sanctions.

The foreign secretary, Jeremy Hunt, joined with his French and German counterparts last week to voice their "deep regret" at Washington's withdrawal from the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) and vow to protect European companies from U.S. reprisals if they continue to trade with Iran.

"We don't support the sanctions because they are a strategic error, but we will comply with them", said Abadi, whose country is an ally of both Tehran and Washington.

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