Disneyland Decontaminates Cooling Towers Linked To Legionnaire's Disease Outbreak

Disneyland Decontaminates Cooling Towers Linked To Legionnaire's Disease Outbreak

Disneyland Decontaminates Cooling Towers Linked To Legionnaire's Disease Outbreak

Disneyland voluntarily shut down two water cooling towers in one of its backstage areas after discovering they contained high levels of the bacteria that causes Legionnaire's, according to the Orange County Register. Patients ranged from age 52 to 94.

Legionnaires disease is caused by the Legionella bacteria and can cause potentially fatal respiratory illness and pneumonia.

Nine of the afflicted had visited the park, with the others living or traveling in Anaheim. In a statement, Dr. Pamela Hymel, chief medical officer for Walt Disney Parks and Resorts, said Disneyland learned about the Legionnaires' cases on October 27.

"These towers were treated with chemicals that destroy the bacteria and are now shut down", said Hymel.

Although the Health Care Agency sent alerts to medical providers and other public health departments to help identify other people who have contracted Legionnaire's disease, the agency issued no public press releases or statements because "there was no known, ongoing risk associated with this event", Good said. One person "with additional health issues" died and was not among those who visited the theme park, the Times reported. In this photo, English-Irish boy band The Wanted performs "Santa Claus is Coming To Town" while taping the Disney Parks Christmas Day Parade TV special at the Magic Kingdom park at Walt Disney World Resort in Lake Buena Vista, Florida, Dec. 6, 2013. An employee working in the facility also got infected with the same disease.

More news: Martellus Bennett's former Packers teammate throws him under the bus

Through testing, they learned that two water cooling towers had elevated levels of Legionella bacteria.

The bacteria often spreads though water vapor or mist, and older people or those with compromised immune systems are most susceptible.

OCHCA were notified that of 11 individuals who were diagnosed with the disease, eight had visited the resort.

It is treated with antibiotics, which can improve symptoms and shorten the length of illness. The towers will reopen once they are no longer contaminated, park officials said.

Related news