Facebook Working On Method To Prevent Revenge Porn

Facebook Working On Method To Prevent Revenge Porn

Facebook Working On Method To Prevent Revenge Porn

Facebook is now piloting an unorthodox scheme to combat revenge porn, in which users can send the company nude photos they fear might be shared to stop them from being published.

All one has got to do is to contact Australia's e-Safety Commissioner (since right now they are trying this in Australia) if they're anxious about the fact that their images might get leaked.

Image-based abuse (IBA), which is not just limited to porn or revenge, is a growing concern in Australia.

It is Grant who revealed the details of Facebook plan to ABC news channel in Australia.

FACEBOOK HAS taken a somewhat unorthodox approach to the problem of revenge porn by asking people to send in their nude pics.

The method of nude photo transmission, and the duration such photos are held, could raise fears submitted images could be intercepted in transit or while stored - moreover, hashing technology can be fooled by users simply resizing or cropping images.

However, the trial won't completely solve Australia's revenge porn woes, Clare McGlynn, an expert from Durham Law School, told BBC.

Pirates can manipulate the timing of a video to throw Big G's crawlers off their game, and there's nothing to say that voyeurs won't distort images in a similar way - by applying a filter, for example - to fool Facebook's engine.

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Facebook will then be able to track the hash online with the help of the algorithms used in photos and video matching tools.

It's an idea that sounds like utter madness, but Facebook is at pains to convince users that it's actually a brilliant solution.

The program would then prevent another user from uploading the same photo.

In 2015, it became illegal in Wales and England to share private or sexual images or video without the subject's permission, and as of April 2017, 206 people were prosecuted under these new rules.

Facebook will store the pictures on its secure servers for a short period of time, so it can ensure it's enforcing the policy correctly, reports the Guardian.

This is not the first attempt by the social media giant to combat the increasing menace of revenge porn. "So if somebody tried to upload that same image, which would have the same digital footprint or hash value, it will be prevented from being uploaded", Inman Grant told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation.

Facebook is cracking down on revenge porn on all its apps and websites.

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